2.23.2015

It's Monday! What Are You Reading? From Picture Books to YA


It continues to appear as if I haven't been reading much, but I've spent the last week reading some cookbooks. I hope to get back into the swing of reading because a whole bunch of Holds came in for me at the library and I have my Book Club book to read before March 9. Wish me luck!

[To rehash the concept :: post what you read last week, what you're reading now, and what you plan to read this week. If you have a review of the book(s), great! If you have a picture of the book(s), wonderful! If you have a book giveaway, fantastic! If you just list the title(s) of the book(s), not a problem! Make it as simple or as complex as you need it to be. At least, that's the message I got. This version of the meme is hosted by Jen and Kellee of Teach Mentor Text, which, in turn, was inspired by Sheila over at Book Journey, who hosts the original It's Monday! What Are You Reading?]

WHAT I READ LAST WEEK:



Anno's Magic Seeds by Mitsumasa Anno

Displacement: A Travelogue by Lucy Knisley

Olympians #2, Athena: Grey-Eyed Goddess by George O'Connor

The Port Chicago 50: Disaster, Mutiny, and the Fight for Civil Rights by Steve Sheinkin

WHAT'S ON HOLD RIGHT NOW:


Finding Serendipity by Angelica Banks (aka Heather Rose and Danielle Wood)

2.16.2015

It's Monday! What Are You Reading? From Picture Books to YA


I'm slowing down a bit on reading chapter books because I've been reading "grown up" books the last couple of weeks. Finding Serendipity has been on hold since January, unfortunately. I guess that's the problem with 1) being a slow reader, and 2) checking out too many books from the library; I have to prioritize reading those so I can finish them before their due dates.

[To rehash the concept :: post what you read last week, what you're reading now, and what you plan to read this week. If you have a review of the book(s), great! If you have a picture of the book(s), wonderful! If you have a book giveaway, fantastic! If you just list the title(s) of the book(s), not a problem! Make it as simple or as complex as you need it to be. At least, that's the message I got. This version of the meme is hosted by Jen and Kellee of Teach Mentor Text, which, in turn, was inspired by Sheila over at Book Journey, who hosts the original It's Monday! What Are You Reading?]

WHAT I READ LAST WEEK:



The Adventures of Superhero Girl by Faith Erin Hicks, colors by Cris Peter

Love Will See You Through: Martin Luther King Jr.'s Six Guiding Beliefs (as told by his niece) by Angela Farris Watkins, illustrated by Sally Wern Comport

WHAT'S ON HOLD RIGHT NOW:


Finding Serendipity by Angelica Banks (aka Heather Rose and Danielle Wood)

2.09.2015

It's Monday! What Are You Reading? From Picture Books to YA


It appears that I'm reading for African-American History Month, but it was a bit coincidental that many of the books I put on hold at the library fit the month. You might've also noticed that I'm on a bit of a Christian Robinson kick. The man's artistic style is adorable; simple but still has dimension and depth to it.

I liked a lot of this week's books, but This Book Just Ate My Dog! by Richard Byrne made me laugh out loud in the bookstore. Just sayin'.

[To rehash the concept :: post what you read last week, what you're reading now, and what you plan to read this week. If you have a review of the book(s), great! If you have a picture of the book(s), wonderful! If you have a book giveaway, fantastic! If you just list the title(s) of the book(s), not a problem! Make it as simple or as complex as you need it to be. At least, that's the message I got. This version of the meme is hosted by Jen and Kellee of Teach Mentor Text, which, in turn, was inspired by Sheila over at Book Journey, who hosts the original It's Monday! What Are You Reading?]

WHAT I READ LAST WEEK:


Anna Hibiscus' Song by Atinuke, illustrated by Lauren Tobia


The Case for Loving: The Fight for Interracial Marriage by Selina Alko, illustrated by Selina Alko and Sean Qualls


Earmuffs for Everyone!: How Chester Greenwood Became Known as the Inventor of Earmuffs by Meghan McCarthy

Giant Dance Party by Betsy Bird, illustrated by Brandon Dorman

Josephine: The Dazzling Life of Josephine Baker by Patricia Hruby Powell, illustrated by Christian Robinson

Last Stop on Market Street by Matt de la Peña, illustrated by Christian Robinson

Noodle Magic by Roseanne Greenfield Thong, illustrated by Meilo So

Olympians #3, Hera: The Goddess and Her Glory by George O'Connor

Rain! by Linda Ashman, illustrated by Christian Robinson

This Book Just Ate My Dog! by Richard Byrne

WHAT'S ON HOLD RIGHT NOW:


Finding Serendipity by Angelica Banks (aka Heather Rose and Danielle Wood)

2.02.2015

2015 Youth Media Awards

View the complete list of awards here.

John Newbery Medal: The Newbery Medal is awarded annually to the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children. The award is administered by the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association.

2015 Winner
  • The Crossover by Kwame Alexander
Newbery Honor
  • El Deafo by Cece Bell, illustrated by Cece Bell
  • Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson

Randolph Caldecott Medal: The Randolph Caldecott Medal is awarded annually , to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children. The award is administered by the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association.

2015 Winner
  • The Adventures of Beekle: The Unimaginary Friend illustrated and written by Dan Santat
Caldecott Honor
  • Nana in the City illustrated by Lauren Castillo, written by Lauren Castillo
  • The Noisy Paint Box: The  Colors and Sounds of Kandinsky’s Abstract Art illustrated by Mary GrandPré, written by Barb Rosenstock 
  • Sam & Dave Dig a Hole illustrated by Jon Klassen, written by Mac Barnett
  • Viva Frida illustrated and written by Yuyi Morales
  • The Right Word: Roget and His Thesaurus illustrated by Melissa Sweet, written by Jen Bryant
  • This One Summer illustrated by Jillian Tamaki, written by Mariko Tamaki

Coretta Scott King Book Awards: The Coretta Scott King Book Awards are given annually to outstanding African American authors and illustrators of books for children and young adults that demonstrate an appreciation of African American culture and universal human values. The award is administered by the American Library Association's Ethnic and Multicultural Exchange Round Table (EMIERT).

Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Award

2015 Winner
  • Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson
King Author Honor
  • The Crossover by Kwame Alexander
  • How I Discovered Poetry by Marilyn Nelson 
  • How It Went Down by Kekla Magoon
Coretta Scott King (Illustrator) Book Award

2015 Winner
  • Firebird illustrated by Christopher Myers, written by Misty Copeland 
King Illustrator Honor 
  • Josephine: The Dazzling Life of Josephine Baker illustrated by Christian Robinson, written by Patricia Hruby Powell
  • Little Melba and Her Big Trombone illustrated by Frank Morrison, written by Katheryn Russell-Brown
Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent Award

2015 Winner
  • When I Was the Greatest written by Jason Reynolds
Coretta Scott King – Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement: The Coretta Scott King - Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement is presented in even years to an African American author, illustrator or author/illustrator for a body of his or her published books for children and/or young adults, and who has made a significant and lasting literary contribution. In odd years, the award is presented to a practitioner for substantial contributions through active engagement with youth using award winning African American literature for children and/or young adults, via implementation of reading and reading related activities/programs.

2015 Winner

Deborah D. Taylor is the winner of the Coretta Scott King – Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement. The award pays tribute to the quality and magnitude of beloved children’s author Virginia Hamilton. Taylor’s career in public service began more than 40 years ago with the Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore, where she is currently coordinator of School and Student Services. Her career has been spent as mentor, educator and literacy advocate for young adults. As an inspiring young adult librarian, leader in national associations and university instructor, she has been distinctly effective in introducing young people and her professional colleagues to the outstanding work of African American authors. 


Pura Belpré Awards: The Pura Belpré Award is presented annually to a Latino/Latina writer and illustrator whose work best portrays, affirms, and celebrates the Latino cultural experience in an outstanding work of literature for children and youth. The award is co-sponsored by the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association (ALA), and REFORMA, the National Association to Promote Library and Information Services to Latinos and the Spanish-Speaking, an ALA affiliate.

Pura Belpré Illustrator Awards

2015 Winner
  • Viva Frida illustrated and written by Yuyi Morales
Belpré Illustrator Honor
  • Little Roja Riding Hood illustrated by Susan Guevara, written by Susan Middleton Elya
  • Green Is a Chile Pepper illustrated by John Parra, written by Roseanne Greenfield Thong
  • Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez & Her Family’s Fight for Desegregation illustrated and written by Duncan Tonatiuh
Pura Belpré Author Award

2015 Winner
  • I Lived on Butterfly Hill written by Marjorie Agosín, illustrated by Lee White 
Belpré Author Honor
  • Portraits of Hispanic American Heroes written by Juan Felipe Herrera, illustrated by Raúl Colón

Theodor Seuss Geisel Award: The Geisel Award is given annually to the author(s) and illustrator(s) of the most distinguished American book for beginning readers published in English in the United States during the preceding year. The award is administered by the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association.

2015 Winner
  • You Are (Not) Small written by Anna Kang and illustrated by Christopher Weyant
Geisel Honor Books
  • Mr. Putter & Tabby Turn the Page written by Cynthia Rylant, illustrated by Arthur Howard
  • Waiting Is Not Easy! written and illustrated by Mo Willems

Mildred L. Batchelder Award: The Mildred L. Batchelder Award is an annual citation awarded to an American publisher for a children's book considered to be the most outstanding of those books originally published in a foreign language in a foreign country, and subsequently translated into English and published in the United States. The award is administered by the Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC), a division of the American Library Association.

2015 Winner
  • Mikis and the Donkey is the 2015 Batchelder Award winner. The book was written by Bibi Dumon Tak, illustrated by Philip Hopman, translated by Laura Watkinson
Batchelder Honor
  • Hidden: A Child’s Story of the Holocaust written by Loic Dauvillier, illustrated by Marc Lizano, color by Greg Salsedo, translated by Alexis Siegel
  • Nine Open Arms written by Benny Lindelauf, illustrated by Dasha Tolstikova, translated by John Nieuwenhuizen

Schneider Family Book Award: The Schneider Family Book Awards honor an author or illustrator for a book that embodies an artistic expression of the disability experience for child and adolescent audiences. The award is administered by the American Library Association.

2015 Winners
  • A Boy and a Jaguar written by Alan Rabinowitz, illustrated by Catia Chien (for children ages 0 to 10)
  • Rain Reign written by Ann M. Martin (for children ages 11-13)
  • Girls Like Us written by Gail Giles(for children ages 13-18)

Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Medal: The Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Medal is awarded annually to the author(s) and illustrator(s) of the most distinguished informational book published in the United States in English during the preceding year. The award is administered by the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association.

2015 Winner
  • The Right Word: Roget and His Thesaurus written by Jen Bryant, illustrated by Melissa Sweet
Sibert Honor Books 
  • Brown Girl Dreaming written by Jacqueline Woodson
  • The Family Romanov: Murder, Rebellion, & the Fall of Imperial Russia written by Candace Fleming
  • Josephine: The Dazzling Life of Josephine Baker written by Patricia Hruby Powell, illustrated by Christian Robinson
  • Neighborhood Sharks: Hunting with the Great Whites of California’s Farallon Islands written and illustrated by Katherine Roy
  • Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez & Her Family’s Fight for Desegregation written and illustrated by Duncan Tonatiuh

Stonewall Book Award - Mike Morgan & Larry Romans Children’s & Young Adult Literature Award: Stonewall Book Award - Mike Morgan & Larry Romans Children’s & Young Adult Literature Award is given annually to English-language works of exceptional merit for children or teens relating to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender experience. The award is administered by the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Round Table of the American Library Association.

2015 Winners
  • This Day in June written by Gayle E. Pitman, Ph.D., illustrated by Kristyna Litten 
Honor Books
  • Beyond Magenta: Transgender Teens Speak Out by Susan Kuklin, photographed by Susan Kuklin 
  • I’ll Give You the Sun written by Jandy Nelson
  • Morris Micklewhite and the Tangerine Dress written by Christine Baldacchino, illustrated by Isabelle Malenfant

Laura Ingalls Wilder Award: The Laura Ingalls Wilder Award honors an author or illustrator whose books, published in the United States, have made, over a period of years, a substantial and lasting contribution to literature for children. The award is administered by the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association,  and presented every two years.

2015 Winner
  • The 2015 winner is Donald Crews, whose award-winning works include “Freight Train,” which was a Caldecott Honor Book in 1979, and “Truck,” a Caldecott Honor Book in 1981. He has been consistently excellent with a wide range of titles, such as “Harbor,” “Parade,” “Shortcut” and “Bigmama’s,” all published by Greenwillow Books.

It's Monday! What Are You Reading? From Picture Books to YA


Really fantastic selection of nonfiction picture books this week!

[To rehash the concept :: post what you read last week, what you're reading now, and what you plan to read this week. If you have a review of the book(s), great! If you have a picture of the book(s), wonderful! If you have a book giveaway, fantastic! If you just list the title(s) of the book(s), not a problem! Make it as simple or as complex as you need it to be. At least, that's the message I got. This version of the meme is hosted by Jen and Kellee of Teach Mentor Text, which, in turn, was inspired by Sheila over at Book Journey, who hosts the original It's Monday! What Are You Reading?]

WHAT I READ LAST WEEK:



At the Same Moment, Around the World by Clotilde Perrin

A few observations (i.e., not necessarily good or bad, just something I noticed):
  • On the page featuring what's happening in Paris, there's a man smoking a cigarette, walking down the street. Do you often see images of smokers in American picture books? Also, on the San Francisco page, Sharon and Peter (I'm assuming they're adults) are kissing. Again, are there a lot of images of kissing with lips touching in American picture books? The book was originally published in France, and there must be some European sensibilities that differ from American ones. 
  • The picture for Australia features Ayers Rock. That's the name I learned growing up, but for the last 15-20 years, I've called it Uluru, which is the Aboriginal name of this sacred place. Officially, it has the dual name of Uluru/Ayers Rock, but it seems that even in Australia, Uluru is a more commonly used name. So, why did the author (or Chronicle Books) choose to use the Western name?
  • Another thing I'm always curious about is translated works. For novels, the translator's name is often prominently printed on the cover and/or the title page. But, for picture books, I've recently noticed that you have to check the fine print on the copyright page, and what you often find is something akin to, "Translation, and text on pages xx-xx, copyright © 2014 by [name of American publisher]." So, who does the actual translating? Why don't they get credit? And what about reliability of the translation?
The Emperor of Absurdia by Chris Riddell

A Fine Dessert: Four Centuries, Four Families, One Delicious Treat by Emily Jenkins, illustrated by Sophie Blackall

I love this book rather a lot, so I plan to write a separate post about it. 

Handle with Care: An Unusual Butterfly Journey by Loree Griffin Burns, photography by Ellen Harasimowicz

I Didn't Do My Homework Because... by Davide Cali, illustrated by Benjamin Chaud

Neighborhood Sharks: Hunting with the Great Whites of California's Farallon Islands by Katherine Roy

What an amazingly illustrated nonfiction picture book about the Great Whites that feed off of the Farallon Islands near San Francisco! The information is top-notch too, and is presented in a really easy to understand way. I particularly liked how Roy illustrated "the perfect body" of a shark like an airplane. (In that case, however, the word choice of "torpedo-shaped bodies" doesn't match up with the illustration.) And the blood! There are some pretty dramatic illustrations of the shark feeding on a seal. The one thing I was confused about is why the subtitle uses the term "Great White," but in the text of the book, she calls them "white sharks."


I'm often drawn to macabre and odd images, and this book satisfied me greatly. My one complaint is that I rather wished there was information about how Walter Potter taxidermied (is that a word?) the animals to fit his tableaus. I showed my animal-loving daughter the book and she was not amused. I was told, "Oh, nooooooooooooooo!" and "Here's your creepy book back!" and she refused to even look at the cover while I was reading it. 

Young Miss Holmes, Casebook 1-2 by Kaoru Shintani

WHAT I'M READING NOW:


Finding Serendipity by Angelica Banks (aka Heather Rose and Danielle Wood)

WHAT I PLAN TO READ THIS WEEK: